Smart Card Market Forecast to 2014


The global smart card industry has been witnessing dynamic changes for the past few years, and these, in turn, have created significant opportunities for the market participants. New and attractive growth prospects are being witnessed due to EMV (Euro pay, MasterCard, & VISA) migration, Long Term Evolution (LTE) deployment across the globe, and government support. Moreover, the entry of innovative smart card devices in the market will further strengthen the overall industry in the long run.According to our research report "Smart Card Market Forecast to 2014", the global shipments of smart cards are estimated to reach around 6.1 Billion units in 2011, growing at the rate of around 11% over previous year. A major chunk of this market is captured by four companies, namely Gemalto, Giesecke & Devrient, Oberthur, and Morpho. Though telecom sector is still the major user of smart cards, other sectors, such as financial services and healthcare are also expected to augment the rate of usage. Furthermore, the huge demand for smart cards will be seen in emerging markets as some of the key manufacturers in these regions are expanding their market reach. Increasing penetration of 3G, and renowned focus on payment transaction will give a further boost to the momentum. In addition, the liability associated with EMV standard is also driving many banks to issue smart cards. Backed by such positive factors, the global smart card shipments are expected to post a double digit growth (CAGR of around 12%) during 2011-2014. business market researchContactless technology is the buzzword in the global smart card industry. Increasing demand for contactless smart cards is mainly being fuelled by Near Field Communication (NFC), mass transit projects and e-passports.

The volume of secure microprocessor contactless smart card shipment is likely to grow at a CAGR of around 22% during 2011-2014. At the applications front, financial services sector is the key user of contactless smart cards, and e-passports and other identification (ID) applications hold the prominent position in the government sector.The report is an outcome of an extensive research and in-depth analysis of the global smart card market. It took into account almost all the key aspects of the market. The report is categorized on the basis of industry applications in sectors, like telecom, transport, public sector and financial services, and country wise developments in the smart card sector.

The report also investigates the current market trends, and analyzes their impact on the future performance of the industry. Moreover, with a focus on the competitive environment, the report provides a comprehensive description of strengths and weeknesses of the market leaders. Overall, the report aims at providing clients with an optimum source of knowledge and statistics on the smart card industry.List of Figures:Figure 4-1: Global - Smart Card Shipment (Billion Units), 2009-2014Figure 4-2: Global - Forecast for Smart Card Shipment by Application (%), 2014Figure 4-3: Global - Secure Microprocessor Contactless Smart Card Shipment (Million Units), 2009-2014Figure 4-4: Global - Secure Microprocessor Contactless Smart Card Shipment by Application (%), 2011Figure 5-1: Global - Smart Card Shipment in Telecom Sector (Billion Units), 2009-2014Figure 5-2: Global - Smart Card Shipment in Transport Sector (Million Units), 2009-2014Figure 5-3: Global - Smart Card Shipment in Government/Healthcare Sector (Million Units), 2009-2014Figure 5-4: Global - Smart Card Shipment in Financial Services (Million Units), 2009-2014Figure 6-1: US - Number of Contactless Payment Cards in Circulation (Million Units), 2009 & 2012Figure 6-2: India - Number of Smart Cards in Circulation (Million Units), 2009-2014Figure 6-3: China - Number of Smart Cards in Circulation (Billion Units), 2009-2014Figure 6-4: Japan - Number of Smart Cards Issued (Million Units), 2009-2014Figure 6-5: South Korea - Smart Card Shipment (Million Units), 2009-2014For more information kindly visit :Smart Card Market Forecast to 2014OrBharat Book BureauTel: +91 22 27810772 / 27810773Fax: + 91 22 27812290Email: info@bharatbook.comWebsite: http://www.bharatbook.comFollow us on twitter: !/Sandhya3B

U.S. life expectancy in 2020 saw biggest drop since WWII

U.S. life expectancy fell by a year and a half in 2020, the largest one-year decline since World War II, public health officials said Wednesday. The decrease for both Black Americans and Hispanic Americans was even worse: three years.

The drop spelled out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is due mainly to the COVID-19 pandemic, which health officials said is responsible for close to 74% of the overall life expectancy decline. More than 3.3 million Americans died last year, far more than any other year in U.S. history, with COVID-19 accounting for about 11% of those deaths.

Black life expectancy has not fallen so much in one year since the mid-1930s, during the Great Depression. Health officials have not tracked Hispanic life expectancy for nearly as long, but the 2020 decline was the largest recorded one-year drop.

The abrupt fall is "basically catastrophic," said Mark Hayward, a University of Texas sociology professor who studies changes in U.S. mortality.

Killers other than COVID-19 played a role. Drug overdoses pushed life expectancy down, particularly for whites. And rising homicides were a small but significant reason for the decline for Black Americans, said Elizabeth Arias, the report's lead author.

Other problems affected Black and Hispanic people, including lack of access to quality health care, more crowded living conditions, and a greater share of the population in lower-paying jobs that required them to keep working when the pandemic was at its worst, experts said.

Life expectancy is an estimate of the average number of years a baby born in a given year might expect to live. It’s an important statistical snapshot of a country’s health that can be influenced both by sustained trends such as obesity as well as more temporary threats like pandemics or war that might not endanger those newborns in their lifetimes.

For decades, U.S. life expectancy was on the upswing. But that trend stalled in 2015, for several years, before hitting 78 years, 10 months in 2019. Last year, the CDC said, it dropped to about 77 years, 4 months.

Other findings in the new CDC report:

—Hispanic Americans have longer life expectancy than white or Black Americans, but had the largest decline in 2020. The three-year drop was the largest since the CDC started tracking Hispanic life expectancy 15 years ago.

—Black life expectancy dropped nearly three years, to 71 years, 10 months. It has not been that low since 2000.

—White life expectancy fell by roughly 14 months to about 77 years, 7 months. That was the lowest the lowest life expectancy for that population since 2002.

—COVID-19's role varied by race and ethnicity. The coronavirus was responsible for 90% of the decline in life expectancy among Hispanics, 68% among white people and 59% among Black Americans.

—Life expectancy fell nearly two years for men, but about one year for women, widening a longstanding gap. The CDC estimated life expectancy of 74 years, 6 months for boys vs. 80 years, 2 months for girls.

More than 80% of last year's COVID deaths were people 65 and older, CDC data shows. That actually diminished the pandemic's toll on life expectancy at birth, which is swayed more by deaths of younger adults and children than those among seniors.

That's why last year's decline was just half as much as the three-year drop between 1942 and 1943, when young soldiers were dying in World War II. And it was just a fraction of the drop between 1917 and 1918, when World War I and a Spanish flu pandemic devastated younger generations.

Life expectancy bounced back after those drops, and experts believe it will this time, too. But some said it could take years.

Too many people have already died from COVID-19 this year, while variants of the coronavirus are spreading among unvaccinated Americans — many of them younger adults, some experts said.

"We can't. In 2021, we can't get back to pre-pandemic" life expectancy, said Noreen Goldman, a Princeton University researcher.

source : newsday.com